Erik Dietman

Erik Dietman’s sculpture - the small island at the entrance to Brønnøysund, and which is transformed into a fish - is a work of art that could be called land art in the way it uses a geographical formation as a basis. At the same time, this artwork turns all the usual thoughts of land art on their head. Where land art often has focused on the notion of art as the object, Dietman does the opposite; he transforms the geography into a figure; landscape into an object.

This is characteristic of Dietman’s way of thinking. He constantly questions our way of thinking and our obsession with creating categories, rules and systems. His message seems to be what the story (not only the entire visual world, but also the language) can offer us if we only dare look without preconceptions, without categorising. Dietman looks at the world and culture playfully and humorously. It appears as though he alludes to a liberation of the imagination and joy of life, even if that joy is complex and often includes dark elements.

Erik Dietman moved to France in the 1950s, where he lived until his death in 2002. He regularly had exhibitions in Sweden, but also exhibited in Denmark and Finland. Dietman’s major retrospective was at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm in 1987. This exhibition was also shown in Helsinki, Amsterdam and Lyon. In 1994, Erik Dietman had a major exhibition at the Pompidou Centre in Paris. Dietman works have also featured in many international exhibitions throughout the world. He has produced large public sculptures in France and Sweden.

Erik Dietman

Født
: 1937 Jönköping, Sverige
Død: 2002, Frankrike